iHSD TECHNOLOGY

The Integrated Harrington Seed Destructor – iHSD is a means to control weed seeds by way of mechanical impact trauma to the seed. The iHSD is integrated directly into the chaff stream of a combine harvester providing harvest time weed control and prevents the vast majority of weed seeds from entering the soil seed bank.

The iHSD has major advantages over many traditional weed control methods. iHSD is a modular package that generally requires only minor adjustments to existing harvesting operations:

  • Harvest time weed seed control prevent weed seeds entering the seed bank
    • Fewer weeds emerge in following seasons, enabling chemical control to be more targeted and efficient
  • Mechanical control is non-selective toward herbicide resistant seeds
    • Lessens critical build up of herbicide resistant weed strains
    • This will delay development, if not eliminate herbicide resistant weed strains
    • Fewer herbicide resistant weeds emerge and can be targeted with highly effective control measures, generally too expensive to consider at broad scale
  • Organic matter and residue is returned to the soil
    • Promoting a healthier, more stable soil profile
    • Less organic supplements are required
  • One pass processing at harvest
    • No chaff carts
    • No wind rows
  • No burning
    • Reduced fire risk to property and the environment
    • No smoke pollution created
    • Reduced seasonal fuel loads (i.e. stockpiling over fire ban season)
    • Retained soil organics and corresponding soil nutrient holding capacity

“Weeds are one of the greatest constraints to grower profitability costing the industry $3b every year, and the weed destructor technology is an important part of our integrated weed management response,”

Mr Kim Halbert

Integrated HSD technology moves to commercial phase with de Bruin Engineering

The Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) is pleased to announce regional South Australian company de Bruin Engineering as its exclusive Licensee to develop and commercialise the in-header seed destructor technology.

 

GRDC: iHSD technology moves to commercial phase with de Bruin Engineering

The Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) is pleased to announce regional South Australian company de Bruin Engineering as its exclusive Licensee to develop and commercialise the in-header seed destructor technology.

GRDC Deputy Chair Kim Halbert said moving to the commercialisation phase for this technology has been much anticipated by the Australian grains industry.

“Weeds are one of the greatest constraints to grower profitability costing the industry $3b every year, and the weed destructor technology is an important part of our integrated weed management response,” Mr Halbert said.

The GRDC has invested in mechanical harvest weed seed destruction for eight years, developing an idea first conceptualised by WA grower Ray Harrington around 20 years ago.

The Harrington Seed Destructor (HSD), which was commercialised by de Bruin Engineering in 2012, is a unit towed behind harvest equipment to kill weed seeds in chaff after it exits a harvester. This technology won the prestigious Edison Awards for Smart Agriculture last year.

In parallel, a complementary concept has been designed and engineered, allowing the attachment of a weed destruction device directly onto harvest equipment.

This development was achieved by the agricultural engineering group at the University of South Australia, including Nick Berry, Chris Saunders and John Fielke, with the support of GRDC funding.

Design and testing of the concept also involved collaboration with Mr Harrington and researchers at the Australian Herbicide Resistance Institute (AHRI).

Mr Halbert said de Bruin Engineering, as GRDC’s commercial partner for both the tow-behind and harvester-integrated solutions, offer extensive know-how in the commercialisation of weed seed destruction technology, and provide a single port of call for customers of these technologies.

“While the proof of concept for the integrated technology is currently limited to only a few makes/models, under the new licensing deal, de Bruin Engineering have committed to investing in the further development of the technology for application across harvester platforms – with the aim of extending this technology to the maximum number of growers.

“Successful commercialisation of this harvester-integrated technology will represent another important tool available for growers to incorporate into their weed control strategies,” Mr Halbert said.

HSD DEVELOPMENT

The latest generation of Harrington Seed Destructor is the culmination of 20 years of development and research starting with an idea conceived by Western Australian farmer Ray Harrington.

Ray was driven by the knowledge that Australian farmers were fighting a war to eradicate weeds in their cash crops. From the 1970s the introduction of cheap, highly effective herbicides has been the farmer’s main defence against weed infestation, but over the course of time through natural selection, herbicide resistant strains of weeds have become a critical issue in many areas of Australia across all staple crop varieties.

Ray’s idea was brilliantly simple - What if there was a way to reliably destroy weed seeds mechanically during the harvest process? Enter HSD technology: the chaff stream from a combine harvester is intercepted and fed directly into a high speed mill that pulverises the chaff, including weed seeds that would otherwise pass through the harvester and be returned to the field. The Australian Grains Research and Development Council (GRDC) understood the importance of Ray Harrington’s endeavour and commitment to design a machine capable of destroying weed seeds prevalent in the waste from the harvesting process. The GDRC provided funding and UniSA provided research and development expertise to further develop HSD technology.

The first tow-behind units were developed commercially by de Bruin Engineering and won the prestigious Edison Award for Smart Agriculture http://www.edisonawards.com/winners2015.php but the tow behind unit was quickly overshadowed by the promise of HSD technology integrated right onto the harvester. Finally, after years of research and development by UniSA funded by GRDC, through many trials by and tribulations HSD technology enters its ultimate phase - introducing the Integrated Harrington Seed Destructor – iHSD.

COMMERCIALISATION

De Bruin Engineering is proud to be awarded the exclusive licence to commercialise and manufacture the Integrated Harrington Seed Destructor – iHSD.

De Bruin Engineering is currently developing a commercial product based on the proof-of-concept prototype developed by UniSA. By integrating industrial components, systems proven in the field, and by addressing issues of everyday farm use, de Bruin Engineering will deliver a robust solution to the market in the shortest practicable time.

In 2016 commercial prototypes will be followed by a limited commercial release model of iHSD available for selected Case and New Holland combine harvester models. The commercial iHSD will be monitored and assessed in the field during 2016 harvest, any improvements will be incorporated into future models. In following years additional combine harvester models will be selected on their capacity and suitability for iHSD installation and kits will be available through local combine harvester dealerships.

WHERE TO BUY

The full production of 2016 iHSD has been allocated. 2017 production is being planned now, so, contact us to register your interest, or place your order to avoid disappointment.

Dealer Enquiries

McIntosh and Son
Katanning (WA) Branch

Lot 4 Nyabing Road
(PO Box 886)
Katanning WA 6317

katanning@mcson.com.au

Phone: +61 8 9821 7000
Fax: +61 8 9821 5265

Register your interest

de Bruin Engineering

PO Box 52
Mount Gambier, South Australia 5290

Phone +61 8 8721 3000
Fax +61 8 8725 8003

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